PRINCE HAMLET by WHY NOT THEATRE (CANADA)

I ushered, FOH, this play at the Fredric Woods Theatre at UBC On Saturday 26th January 2018 twice, I did the Matinee performance and then again the evening performance. I arrived early at UBC in the morning, walked around as its so beautiful at this campus I just like to walk around, had a coffee and then made my way to the theatre.

PRINCE HAMLET Push Festival

This was such an amazing play. What was very different from many other shows I have attended and worked at was that this was an ASL integrated performance. One character Horatio is Deaf and only signed throughout the show. Not only did she sign her lines but interpreted for all the other characters as well. All the Characters signed at various points throughout the show and sometimes their was voice only or asl only. It was amazing to see.

I was so impressed with the simple stage and loved the dirt being used and the lighting was especially fantastic.
As I was there for both performances this day I got to enjoy it twice.

Several rows in the centre of the audience section was set aside for Deaf and Hard Of Hearing patrons so they had a good site line. A lot of users were available for these performances and included ushers who were also ASL interpreters and others who knew some ASl including myself who is learning and know a little bit. For the first time at a show I was able to engage a bit with some Deaf patrons in the Lobby prior to, during intermission and after the show. I really enjoyed that and it propels me to continue my ASL studies.

PALMYRA – BERTRAND LESCA AND NASI VOUTSAS (FRANCE/UK)


Wednesday January 23th Ushered at this Play for the Push Festical at Performance works in the evening. I’ve always liked this venue, one of my favourites.

From the Push Website :
“In this prizewinning piece, the set is almost bare and broken crockery is the main prop; PALMYRA may seem slight at first glance, but it’s about as rich in implication as one could ask for. The situation can be described bluntly and simply: two men are onstage, and one of them has a plate while the other does not. From this, conflict emerges that ranges from the comical to the brutal. The audience is drawn into the work in surprising and provocative ways…

Named after a Syrian city that has changed hands several times during the current fighting, this show slowly builds to the level of violence, creating and sustaining moral ambiguity along the way. What emerges is a meditation on revenge, world politics and the positions from which we judge them. The small-scale war onstage grows large in the mind; very rarely does one see so much communicate with so few resources. In its humour, its aggression and its pathos, this is a stunning work.”

Seriously, for me this was a very disturbing performance and I know it was supposed to be. as an usher I was very concerned for the patrons who I can see and hear were very upset with one character in particular and at one point I had to go and ask one patron who was actively involved with one character if she was ok, I’m still processing my feelings from this show. the level of physiological violence was way over the top for me.

THE CHILDREN ARE WATCHING US

My First Shift this year 2019 with The Vancouver Push Festival

I was a greeter at the Vancity Theatre on Seymour street for the Italian Film “
The Children Are Watching Us
by VITTORIO DE SICA and PRESENTED WITH VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL.

A heartbreaking tale of a family breakup witnessed through the eyes of a child. Shot in 1942 . My job was really easy, basically all I did together with one other volunteer just greet patrons coming in and offer Push Guides, then sat down and watched the film and then when it was over, left.

I enjoyed the film, but it was really dark and made me cry a lot, bringing up memories from my own childhood which I related to a lot. I have 7 more shifts with this Festival. Hope to post more in the following weeks.

Mr. Burns

A Post-Electric Play
I was so excited to Usher this play Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play on Friday night April 20th. I had been looking forward to it since I first heard about it and since I met one of the Actors, Douglas Ennenberg while volunteering at The Talking Stick First Nations Festival this past Fall in 2017.

Produced by Little Mountain Lion Productions

It was a sold out show it went very well, I also enjoyed talking to Matt on of the producers and the FOH Denice who gave me some very helpful advice on how to get work in Theatre which is definitively a goal of mine after enjoying so many shows this m past year.

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Really good review by Colin Thomas